Is there a market for short films?

Last week, Viddsee launched an iOS app, which is a native app for people to watch short films on their mobile device. Viddsee, a Singaporean startup, is dealing with an industry that is close to my heart and so I want to see it succeed. However, I do wonder if the short films genre is enough for them to survive. YouTube is the 800-pound gorilla and has every conceivable genre under its platform. It's easy for users to switch between genres on YouTube. You might be listening to music one moment and then watch a short film the next. This variety is powerful as I don't know anyone who sits and watch the same genre over and over again on YouTube (with music videos being the exception, but then the user is using that mostly as a personal radio and not as a video platform). Even if we remove YouTube out of the equation, there is still Vimeo, which has a stronger branding and presence than Viddsee. Comparing Viddsee to Qello, the "Netflix for music films", and I think Qello has a better shot. Why? Because as Qello's CEO puts it, "Less than 8% of our [Qello's] content is on Netflix." That means that Qello is becoming the only place for people to find music films. It won't be on Netflix, it won't be on YouTube, and it won't be on Vimeo. Viddsee's contents, however, should be on other competing platform because those other platforms offer the producers higher viewership. Viddsee signed a content distribution deal with Yahoo back in March, but I'm still wondering how they plan to monetize their content. According to Tan, one of the co-founders, at some point Viddsee will make money on mobile via advertising or a subscription model, which again begs the question, "Is there a market for short films?". I would love for the answer to be yes, but looking at YouTube and Vimeo, I think Viddsee has their work cut out for them. They need to execute fast and flawless to dominate the short film platform in Asia.